Contents

Choice and competition

Policy actions sorted A-Z.

Create a certification mark for transparency, privacy and security

Products that meet certain requirements of transparency, privacy and security are awarded a certification mark so that people know they can trust the product.

Examples

Commentary

Related policy actions: Certification, Choice and competition, Education and awareness, Markets, Privacy, Security

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Create the right to repair

Consumers are given information and the legal right to repair products they’ve bought, to reduce reliance on official service providers and to increase the longevity of consumer goods.

Examples

Commentary

Definitions

Related policy actions: Choice and competition, DRM, Fair and clear ownership, Redress, Repair

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Enable people to move their data between services

People have the right to port their data between service providers so that they have genuine choice of providers. This is distinct from “enable people to access data held about them in an agreed format” as the particular data about a consumer isn’t readily accessible to them, but a transfer between services can be made.

Examples

Commentary

Definitions

Related policy actions: Choice and competition, Markets, Personal data, Redress, Regulation, User experience

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Establish a competition framework that can address digital monopolies

Competition authorities can act to address the issues created by digital monopolies. This prevents services from having a stronghold on a certain sector, for example Uber in public transportation, and allows emerging services an ability to compete in the market.

Examples

Commentary

Related policy actions: Choice and competition, Markets, New business models, Regulation

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Establish compatible standards for consumer legislation across borders

Create legislation that is compatible across national borders, to ensure consumer rights are consistent where consumers purchase goods and services in a country other than the place they live.

Examples

Commentary

Related policy actions: Choice and competition, Fair and clear ownership, Legislation, Open data, Redress

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Fair use of digital content

Create or update legislation around the fair use of copyrighted material. This should extend the personal use rights of consumers to apply to digital content. A lot of current copyright law around content is based on physical media; someone who purchases a DVD can lend it to another person. This concept of ownership is less clear with digital content.

Examples

Commentary

Definitions

Related policy actions: Access, Choice and competition, Copyright, Fair and clear ownership, Regulation, Reuse

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Guarantee net neutrality

Internet service providers are legally forbidden from prioritising data transfer by a certain digital service to ensure consumers have equal access to all services on any connection plan.

Examples

Commentary

Definitions

Related policy actions: Access, Choice and competition, Infrastructure, Markets, Regulation

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Publish guidance for government procurement to shape markets

Government issues guidance on how it procures services, which in turn has the potential to improve the quality of consumer products available in the market.

Examples

Related policy actions: Choice and competition, Education and awareness, Markets

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Require clear pricing and description at point of purchase or advertisement

Rules stipulate how the pricing of digital services should be presented so people know what they are buying.

Examples

Commentary

Related policy actions: Access, Choice and competition, Education and awareness

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Right to choose a service provider

Consumer devices that require a service provider to function, like a mobile phone needs a mobile network, should not be locked into a particular provider to encourage competition between service providers and to maintain consumer choice. It may be necessary for a minimum contract period to run out, particularly for subsidised devices, but the consumer must be able to change networks after their contractual obligations have been met.

Examples

Commentary

Related policy actions: Access, Choice and competition, Markets

Link to this policy action